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Rabbit Information

Rabbits are popular pets due to their social, quiet, and intelligent nature. There are many breeds and varieties. The average life span is 8-12 years.

 

DietA good rabbit diet should be made up of good quality pellets, fresh hay, water and fresh vegetables. Anything beyond this is a "treat" and should be given in limited quantities.

• Hay is essential to a rabbit's good health

• Pellets should be fresh and high in fiber. NO SEEDS OR COLORED PIECES

• Offer a variety of vegetables including leafy greens and root vegetables. Add one vegetable to the diet at a time. See Rabbit Safe Food List for more information

  • Remember fruit should always be given in moderation as the high sugar content may cause diarrhea.
  • Introduce fruits and vegetables slowly over several weeks.
  • NO PESTICIDES!!!!

Habitat - Rabbit habitats should include a water bottle or bowl, feed bowl, hay, and toys. Bowls need to be heavy enough not to be tipped over. Provide a litter box with paper based litter such as carefresh or pelleted paper. Solid flooring is recommended for the safety of your rabbit’s feet.  If your bunny starts to chew on or ingest any of the non-natural floor coverings, replace them with another item. A hooded litter box or a pet carrier may be placed in a room for privacy. Bunny-proofing your home is part of living with a house rabbit. It is important to keep your rabbit from chewing on furniture, rugs, drapes, and, most deadly of all, electrical cords. It is imperative that electrical cords be hidden or covered with tubing or hard plastic casing, since one bite by your bunny could be fatal. Give your rabbit enough attention, safe chewable items and toys, so that it is distracted from chewing furniture and rugs. To keep bunnies happy and relieve boredom, provide them with plenty of toys. 

Socialization - Offering your hand for a rabbit to sniff, much as you would for a cat or dog, is generally not the best way to introduce yourself to rabbit. Most rabbits also do not like having the tips of their nose or chin touched either. Instead, begin by softly stroking the top of the head. Rabbits possess a relatively lightweight, delicate skeleton paired with extremely strong, well-developed back and leg muscles. With improper restraint, rabbits that struggle or kick run the risk of a broken back or leg. Veterinary staff can demonstrate the proper way to pick up a pet rabbit, however NEVER lift a rabbit by the ears or neck scruff.

Veterinary Care - It is normal for a rabbit to ingest their feces. Cecotropes (first pass/ night feces) contain vital nutrients that the rabbit must reingest. Cecotropes look like melted chocolate and are usually resemble black berries. Female rabbits should be spayed due to induced ovulation. They often endure pain from endometriosis for years if left intact. Spaying your rabbit will also eliminate future reproductive tumors. Rabbits can get hairballs and will stop eating. This leads to gut stasis if not treated immediately. Always monitor your rabbit for eating and pooping! Overgrown teeth, parasites, bacterial infections, and head tilts are just a few of the health issues rabbits can have. They should see their vet twice a year or more if issues present.